Thống kê về Social Media (mạng xã hội) tại Việt Nam 2014

Thống kê mới nhất tại tháng 01 năm 2014 của WeAreSocial sẽ cho chúng ta thấy cái nhìn tổng quan về social media tại Việt Nam.

Sau đây là những con số đáng chú ý:

Một số chỉ số internet

social media marketing

Người dùng tại Việt Nam tiêu tốn hơn 4h37 phút mỗi ngày trên Internet bằng thiết bị máy tính.

Tỉ lệ người người dùng sử dụng mạng xã hội trên Mobile là 34%

Thời gian trung bình người dùng sử dụng internet trung bình hàng ngày trên thiết bị Mobile là 1 giờ 43 phút.

Số người sử dụng Internet tại Việt Nam

social media marketing

Dựa theo biểu đồ chúng ta có thể thấy được tổng quát về người sử dụng internet tại Việt Nam.

Việt Nam với dân số hơn 92 triệu người, trong đó:

– Tính đến nay có hơn 36 triệu người sử dụng Internet

– Tính đến tháng 1/2014 có khoảng 20 triệu tài khoản Facebook chiếm 22% dân số.

– Về điện thoại đã có hơn 134 triệu thuê bao điện thoại đăng ký.

Các chỉ số về mạng xã hội

social media marketing

Tỉ lệ người xâm nhập mạng xã hội trên tổng dân số là 38%

Thời lượng người dùng trung bình vào các mạng xã hội là 2h23 phút.

Tỉ lệ người dùng sử dụng các ứng dụng Social Media trên điện thoại là 58%

Tỉ lệ người dùng sử dụng các dịch vụ theo địa điểm là 25%.

Người Việt sử dụng Smartphone như thế nào?

social media marketing

Tỉ lệ người dùng sử dụng Smartphone 20% tại Việt Nam

Người dùng Smartphone dành phần lớn vào việc tìm kiếm thông tin địa phương, tới 97%.

Người dùng tìm kiếm sản phẩm hàng hóa trên smartphone là 95%

Người dùng thực hiện mua hàng qua smartphone chiếm đến 60%

Tỉ lệ các mạng xã hội được sử dụng

social media marketing

Người dùng Facebook hoạt động nhiều nhất với 95%.

Tài khoản Google đang sử dụng tăng mạnh và kỳ vọng 2014 là năm bùng nổ nâng lên với 76%

Trong khi đó các mạng xã hội lớn khác như Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest có tỉ lệ % sử dụng là: 45%, 22% và 18%.

Loại hình trả phí sử dụng mạng xã hội

social media marketing

Việt nam có tới 89% người dùng sử dụng điện thoại theo hình thức trả trước, 11% đăng ký trả sau và 16% người dùng sử dụng 3G.

Lượng người dùng mạng xã hội trên Mobile

social media marketing

Số lượng đăng ký sử dụng băng thông rộng với 17.6 triệu người

Tỉ lệ người đăng ký di động băng thông rộng chiếm 19% trong tổng dân số

Số lượng người dùng sử dụng các mạng xã hội trên điện thoại chiếm đến 17 triệu người

Lượng người dùng Mạng xã hội trên Mobile chiếm tới 18%.

Với những thông tin chi tiết có ích trên, những người làm kinh doanh sẽ có cái nhìn tổng quá hơn về thị trường mạng xã hội đầu năm 2014 tại Việt Nam để phục vụ các chiến lược marketing của công ty mình.

26 Ways to Create Engaging Content

Written by: Debbie Hemley. Source: socialmediaexaminer.com

 

Are you looking to create content that engages?

Does your content connect with people and encourage them to engage?

In this article I’ll show you 26 ways to make content that engages people, in an A-Z guide of tips.

#1: Authors Matter

Written content doesn’t exist without authors, whether constructing 140-character posts or 1000-word articles.  Not only do you want people who can write well (e.g., clear points, proper spelling and grammar, active voice), you need writers and team members who can think strategically about the content that will resonate most with your audience.

content creation

Creating good content is important for social media engagement.

We’ll talk about more specifics as we go down the list. For now, think strategy.

#2: Blog as a Spoke in the Wheel

A blog provides an opportunity to discuss a topic in-depth. It’s a place where you canoffer explanations and suggestions, demonstrate how-to’s, show thought leadership and generously offer useful content for readers.

Kristi Hines offers these helpful tips for blog content:

  • Analyze your competitors (topics, frequency of posts, who writes them, how they are shared) to see what works and what doesn’t.
  • Make your content valuable and unique.
  • Subscribe to top industry blogs using RSS to keep track of the latest hot topics.
  • Search for people asking questions about your keyword or phrase on Twitter.
  • Ask your sales and support team what questions are asked most frequently by potential or current customers.

Is your blog’s content meeting your customers’ needs and expectations?

#3: Curate Selected Content

In the past couple of years, content curation has become more mainstream as businesses of all sizes and industries have started to adopt the practice.

Content curation is defined as “the process of finding, organizing and sharing online content.”

As Beth Kanter writes, “Content curation is not about collecting links or being an information packrat, it is more about putting them into a context with organization, annotation and presentation.  Content curators provide a customized, vetted selection of the best and most relevant resources on a very specific topic or theme.”

Brian Carter offered his social media posting rule at Social Media Marketing World (SMMW13): Post curated content 50%, original content 30% and promotional material 20% of the time.

 #4: Data Provides Direction

Social data can tell us a lot about industries, customers and prospects; what we should be doing more of and what we should do less of. Jayson DeMers says social data can provide five insights for businesses:

  • Real-time market mood
  • Relevant issues and content
  • User interests
  • Internal operational metrics
  • Competitive research

How are you using social data? Where can you improve your processes?

2012 social media marketing industry report

Source: Social Media Marketing Industry Report.

#5: Email and Social Media Work Hand in Hand

Do you think of email and social media as separate entities?  Do you favor one more than the other?  The fact is, email and social media complement each other quite well.  They leverage one another. Help the other to be seen by an audience that may not have otherwise come across the message.

DJ Waldow offers these valuable tips for integrating email and social media:

  • Include social icons in emails
  • Ask email subscribers to share and connect
  • Send a dedicated email campaign
  • Provide incentive—for example, ask email subscribers to invite friends on Facebook to receive a discount
  • Promote email sign-up via social networks
  • Include “retweet this snippet” in email
  • Build an email opt-in form on Facebook
  • Don’t forget SMS—text your email address
  • Promote email marketing on your blog

#6: Facebook Pages Don’t Guarantee Engagement but are Good Candidates for the Job

The act of setting up a Facebook Page and publishing it for the world to see doesn’t automatically send people running to engage with your business. Engagement strategies should be tried and tested over a period of time.

Mari Smith offers these five factors that help contribute to exceptional engagement and measurable results:

  • Launch creative incentives
  • Post highly shareable content
  • Build a tight community
  • Have a quirky brand—for example, add humor and entertainment
  • Give your fans plenty of excellent content on a regular basis 
    mari smith facebook

    Mari Smith’s “peeps” won’t hesitate to share content they like.

#7: Google+ Provides a Unique Blend of Features and Benefits

Whether you’re a fan of Google+ or not, you should know that it’s a force to be reckoned with. GlobalWebIndex recently reported that Google+ remains the number 2 social network in the world with 359 million monthly active users (Facebook at number 1 with 903 million accounts).

Sarah Bauer suggests that Google+ is rapidly becoming “the most important content publication platform for businesses with an eye on higher search rankings. The data in a piece of content posted on Google+ is immediately indexed for Google search. On Twitter or Facebook, Google has restricted access to the data and indexing can take a few days. AuthorRank, the digital signature for Google+ users, is also set to affect the ranking order for search results.”

Mike Stenger offers these tips for engaging with readers on Google+:

  • Follow active people relevant to your business
  • Take time to comment
  • Participate in hangouts
  • Publish high-quality content

#8: HootSuite Offers Ability to Listen and Engage

HootSuite, a popular social media dashboard, offers ways to narrow in on places to engage with users. As Pawan Deshpande suggests, “…subscribe to a Twitter search for a keyword of interest.  Instead of paying attention to the tweets in your stream, keep an eye on articles, videos, and images that are linked from the tweets to uncover breaking content. Often you will find content before Google is able to even index it.”

Step 1:

keywords

Use HootSuite to keep your eye on a keyword phrase.

Step 2:

monitoring keywords

By monitoring the keyword phrase “content marketing,” you can see real-time results.

#9: Instant Feedback Helps

Social media encourages two-way conversation, so why not take advantage of the feedback you can gain from users on social networksAndres Traslavina offers creative ways to problem-solve and meet marketing and business goals:

  • Collect product feedback
  • Host an online focus group via Twitter Chat
  • Conduct surveys and polls
  • Ask industry experts
  • Crowdsource blog content
  • Develop personas
  • Monitor brand mentions

The information you’re able to glean from customers and prospects will provide in-the-moment and future opportunities for engagement.

#10: Journalist’s Digital Media Pyramid Encourages Engagement

Benjamin A. Davis coined the concept of the “digital media pyramid” as an alternative approach for bloggers and other online journalists from the inverted pyramid used by traditional print journalists. Davis suggests that one of the features of the digital media pyramid is to “encourage the self-education of ‘users’ or readers, enabling them to quickly seek out balanced information on a news story through the use of embedded links, social networks and other sources.”

digital marketing pyramid

Digital media pyramid offers online reporters a valuable framework.

It’s during this “self-education” when engagement is ripe. As readers click on links, businesses can remind them via social sharing buttons and invitations to like, retweet, +1, mention and share the content on multiple channels.  And voilà, before you know it, there’s a whole lot of opportunity for engagement.

#11: Keywords Help Find the Needle in a Haystack

The amount of data being shared online every minute can feel rather daunting. Consider these numbers reported a year ago by Domo:

  • 684,478 pieces of content are shared on Facebook
  • 2,000,000 search queries are made on Google
  • 48 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube
  • 47,000 apps are downloaded from the App Store
  • 3,600 photos are shared on Instagram
  • 571 new websites are created

What would help get your content in front of the people who would most appreciate reading itKeywords, plain and simple.

As Jerilyn Soncrant suggests:

“When posting on your social media networks, include keywords in the following places while remembering they need to sound natural. If it feels obvious that you snuck in a keyword phrase, remove it or try again. Place your keywords:

  • In the Bio or About Us section of all of your social networks
  • In posts when you’re talking about that particular subject
  • In the vanity URL you create for each social network
  • In the titles of your blog posts

#12: LinkedIn’s Role

At times, LinkedIn may appear to be one of the more misunderstood platforms out there. Astute companies have discovered LinkedIn is a key player for engagement. Mike Delgado offers these suggestions:

  • Leverage LinkedIn Groups to find engaging content for company followers.
  • Post status updates often (especially every morning).
  • Add pictures, files, questions, links and contests in status updates.
  • Promote your LinkedIn Company Page badge and product recommendations on your website.
  • Use LinkedIn Recommendation Ads

    Social Media Examiner provides regular updates on LinkedIn and maintains their product offerings utilizing the vast resources of LinkedIn for companies.

#13: Mobile Content Meets People Where They’re At—In the Moment

If you’re running a brick-and-mortar business, mobile content offers a great opportunity to engage potential customers. Christina Zila shares these insights:

“In general, smartphone users look for local information while they’re on the go.  In survey after survey, smartphone users want to know if a close physical location is open. Content for these types of searches shouldinclude basic contact information—address, phone number and operating hours—as well as a short description of the location highlighting why a visitor should choose that location.

And for other types of businesses, Ian Cleary offers suggestions for how to create a blog that is mobile-friendly and a website that is responsively designed.

show business hours

Opt to show your business hours since that’s what mobile users may want to know most. For instance, a search made on a Friday will show Friday’s hours.

#14: Nurture Leads Through Social Media Comment Replies

Some businesses are looking in all the wrong places. They’ll tell you they’re not seeing any return on their social media efforts and then you find that no one has responded to the comments or questions a user left.

Scott Gallagher articulates this point beautifully: “Social media is all about sharing and discussion. If you post a great piece of content, there is a very good chance that you’re going to get people commenting on it. These are your leads, and you need to encourage them to become more. This is where many people fall apart on their social media strategies. They don’t realize that replying to the comments on media can be as important as the creation of the content itself. When someone comments, you must reply.”

#15: Objectives Are Key

Quick, if someone asked you right now to list your company’s content marketing objectives, do you know the answer? Marissa Peacock points out, “It’s not just about creating any old content; it’s acknowledging that in order to reach more customers, companies must increase their efforts to provide timely and relevant content.”

Timely and relevant content sounds like a good mantra!

#16: Podcasting Offers a Powerful Tool

Podcasting is experiencing huge growth.  Mitch Joel explains ways it can be a powerful tool for engagement. “A credible podcast is a powerful tool in social proofing. Asking recognized authorities and industry thought leaders for a twenty-minute interview not only provides value to an audience, but it can also be used in other ways. A show of this nature is a great internal communications tool to help your peers learn more about the industry you serve.” Joel also said, “Podcasting is a way to network with your industry’s key thought leaders.”

#17: Quora’s Questions and Answers

You may hear mixed emotions about Quora. Some will say that it’s a great resource to see what people in your industry want to know. Elijah Young offers both points of view and highlights these benefits of Quora: “A great place to find content ideas and experts, opportunities for networking and joint ventures.” Conversely he says, “It’s the self-promotion capital of the world.”

What are your thoughts about Quora for engagement pre- and post-content development?

#18: Return on Investment (ROI) is One Part of the Equation

I know—ROI is often the elephant in the room.  But it doesn’t have to be. It just needs to be kept in perspective.  Nichole Kelly sums social media ROI this way: “One of the biggest challenges with social media is that we are trying to measure social media in the social channel, when in fact the business value tends to happen on the website or through the email list. You have to stop thinking in terms of one silo and look at social media as one part of the story.”

#19: Storytelling is About Connection

Storytelling has become one of the buzzwords we hear discussed in social media circles.  Some interpret it to mean that the writer has to be able to tell a good story. And while that’s true, there’s something even more powerful about storytelling.

Monica Carter Tagore adds an important dimension: “…storytelling is about connecting with your followers, friends and circles on an emotional level. And when you do, you’ll have a deeper and more meaningful social media conversation.”

share your story

Monica Carter Tagore makes it a practice to share parts of her personal story with readers.

#20: Twitter and CEOs

In many companies, social media community managers monitor the business’ social profiles for company mentions and to share relevant content with their Twitterfollowers.  And while they’re doing a terrific job at it, customers often want to know what CEOs and upper management are thinking, reading and doing in the industry.

Monica Romeri gives this piece of advice: “Encourage your CEO and other company leaders to contribute to your company presence on Twitter.  A CEO can easily use Twitter on the go as a marketing and public relations asset.  It only takes a few minutes in between meetings to share great content along with an insightful comment, so get your CEO and other executive leaders on board with Twitter engagement.”

#21: Unique Content is Crafted

Why does it seem at times that other businesses have more unique content available to them?  The truth of the matter is that they started where you did—without content or maybe with a few old white papers lying around.

Stanford Smith says, “At the beginning of a social media engagement, you don’t have content.  All you have are ingredients.  These ingredients are combined into various types of content.  An impromptu video of the factory floor is turned into a YouTube video.  The sales meeting presentation is transformed into a captivating industry infographic. Customer case studies are turned into insightful blog posts.”

“Content is crafted, not harvested.  You don’t know what you have and how it can be used until you understand your audience’s needs, what they value and share and how customers prefer to gather information about your product. Get these answers and content opportunities become easier to identify.”

#22: Videos Are Often a Top Choice

What is it about a video that captures viewers? For one thing, if done well it has a way of grabbing our attention, educating and entertaining at the same time. We’re taking in a lot of written content all day long. A video offers a few minutes of respite.

Joe Martin suggests, “Marketers should take note of the growth of video within social and mobile channels and look for ways to invest further in video content, and create an engaging experience for users on mobile devices. The ROI of social marketing is on the rise and our data shows that video content will certainly lead to better results than non-video content.”

We’ll talk more about video content in #25, YouTube Videos That Engage.

#23: Webinars Provide an Opportunity for Real-Time Engagement

Webinars, the unique blend of using online experiences for training seminars, have become so mainstream that I can hardly remember the first one I attended or how long ago. The ability to sit at your desk and tune into a training session conducted in another part of the country, or world for that matter, and be exposed to real-time content may be one of the most rewarding experiences that a business can bring to their target audience.

Allison King advises marketers to keep webinar content tightly focused. She says, “It’s better to go in-depth into a narrower topic than to skim the surface on a broader topic. Most webinars are about an hour in length for the presentation, followed by a Q/A session.” To keep your bases covered, Allison has two recommendations:

  • Get the PowerPoint presentation from the speakers two weeks in advance to give yourself a chance to review it and ask for a revision if needed.
  • Have a speaker prep session one week in advance, in which the speakers will rehearse their presentation. 
    infographic

    From Infographic, World Wide Webinars, by ClickMeeting.

In the image above from World Wide Webinars by ClickMeeting, you can see why people organize webinars.

#24: E(x)perience of Users

Nordstrom has been recognized for their customer service excellence. People care about their experiences with businesses—and that goes for online content, too. They’ll be more likely to notice when something isn’t working well, such as a poor navigation scheme, broken links and run-of-the-mill content.  Bottom line, online users expect things to go well.

Blaise Lucey writes, “The best kind of SEO strategy, at its core, provides a seamless user experience when people visit a website. Take a step back and look at your website. Use Google Analytics or another analytics tool to see how people are finding the site in the first place. Then, do some backtracking by clicking that page and pretending you’re a visitor. What do you see? As someone who just came to the site to read a specific blog post, do you want to or feel compelled to click on anything else? Remember that people who are looking for specific information often have tunnel vision. It’s up to you to broaden their horizons with additional content that pulls them further into the site.”

#25: YouTube Videos Work With All Budgets

You don’t need to go to great lengths to create videos for YouTube. Even a small budget with an inexpensive video camera or smartphone camera will go a long way if you don’t have the means to allot more resources. Jeff Bullas offers these ideas for what to record on video and publish:

  • Arrange formal interviews in advance with prepared questions and answers
  • Do casual, impromptu video interviews at a conference
  • Presentations either in part or in full and edited or unedited
  • Video products such as clothes or items that you can publish to your online store that show the product and how it can be adjusted or worn
  • “How-to” videos that teach
  • Grab your smartphone and obtain people’s feedback or comments as they happen about your product, service or store. This will provide authentic and real testimonials that money cannot buy

#26: Zones and Social Media Posting

Social media is a local, national and global experience and knowing good times to post is critical.

For starters, Craig Van Korlaar offers this guideline: “For those of you in the United States who have a national audience, you will want to use Eastern time, as this is where nearly half (48%) of the U.S. population lives (Eastern + Central = 81%). If your audience is primarily local or regional, treat it as local time.”

He also offers a helpful plan and schedule for good times to post content, with translations in eight languages.

Knowing when and where to post makes social media engagement more doable.

 

9 Ways to Become a Better Facebook Community Manager

9 Ways to Become a Better Facebook Community Manager

Source: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com

By 

Would you like to have a thriving Facebook community?

Are you looking for tips to improve your community?

In this article I’ll share 9 tips to improve your Facebook community.

#1: Know Your Voice

Branding is important on social media. Your company should have a “voice” that matches your brand and your company philosophy.

Are you more serious or do you add a little bit of snark in your posts? Do you stick mostly to business or can you be off the wall? Do you like to stir things up or do you remain neutral?

If you are a one-person operation, these decisions may be easy. But if you have multiple employees and possibly multiple people posting to the Facebook Page, you want to have the “voice of the company” communicated clearly to the people who will be managing your Facebook Page.

The voice of the company is important in how comments and community feedback are handled, as well as the day-to-day posting. Consistency in your voice will help your community know what to expect.

know your voiceModCloth has an offbeat, humorous voice that engages their audience.

#2: Have Access to Visuals

Visual marketing is becoming a vital part of Facebook and all social platforms. The more you can incorporate photos, screenshots and graphics, the richer your Facebook Page will be.

Even if your business isn’t visual, make a plan for how you will add images to your posts. You can use things like:

  • A screenshot of something you’re demonstrating
  • An interesting photo with a quote about your niche
  • An infographic with statistics about your niche
  • Behind-the-scenes photos from your company events

I like using tools like SnagitiPiccy or PicMonkey to create or modify images to make them interesting. You can even use PowerPoint to create a slide that you can then export as an image.

use imagesOrange County Animal Services uses creative images.

#3: Know the Rules

As a community manager, make sure you know Facebook’s policies. Pages can be shut down without warning for violating these policies. Usually it’s very difficult to get your Page restored and you don’t want all that hard work to go down the drain for violating Facebook’s contest terms, for example. Make sure you keep up with the updates to the terms as they do change frequently (see #7).

facebook contest violationThis Page is violating Facebook’s Promotion Guidelines and could be shut down.

#4: Know the Industry

If you are managing a Page for someone else, you need to know the industry so you can speak the lingo. It won’t reflect well on the company if you aren’t using the terminology or common acronyms correctly in your posts and follow-up comments.

know the industrySome industries have terms that you will need to know if you are managing a community for someone.

#5: Recognize Members

A community manager needs to recognize contributors and members and get to know them. If you have a physical location, you can take pictures of your community members and recognize them on your Facebook Page.

community membersRecognize your community members who come to your physical location.

Or you can find other ways to recognize your community by featuring them in a post or promoting their business somehow.

community members feature on pagePromote your community members by featuring them on your Page.

#6: Answer Questions Quickly

Promptly respond to posts or questions on your Page to create strong bonds with your community. Even if you don’t know the answer, let them know that you will get back to them. Or point them to a useful resource is another good option.

answer questions quicklyAnswer questions quickly if possible.

The good news is you have more options to get notifications when something happens on your Page. If your Page is large, these can get overwhelming, so you may need toset a schedule to check in. To access your notifications, go to Edit Page > Manage Notifications.

notificationsAdjust your notifications so you can keep on top of your posts.

#7: Stay on Top of Changes

Facebook changes a lot! There are changes to their official policies and in how things are working at any given moment. Make sure you keep track of Facebook’s official changes by following the Newsroom and the Facebook Marketing Page.

facebook news roomFollow the Newsroom on Facebook to see announcements.

For “unofficial” quirks and issues, you can always come to our Facebook Page and ask questions. Another great place to see if others are experiencing the same thing is to come to our Facebook Networking Club.

facebook clubFind out what others are seeing and get your questions answered in our Facebook Networking Club.

Some other great Facebook Pages to help you stay on top of the news are Mari Smith,Social Identities and Jon Loomer Digital.

#8: Respond Calmly to Negative Posts

If you get some angry posts for whatever reason on your Page, think before you fire off an angry response. Respond quickly (even if it’s to say we’ll get back to you), but don’t respond in the heat of the moment when you might feel like “telling them off.”

If you have some upset Facebook fans, there could be a good reason. By dealing calmly with the situation, you can hopefully salvage the relationship.

respond calmlyCampbell’s Condensed Soup acknowledges the customer’s concerns on their Page.

#9: Have Fun

Find some ways to have fun with your communityHave a Facebook “live Q&A chat” timedo a Livestream or even (gasp) go over to a Google+ Hangout.

have funHave fun with your community.

When you are having fun and sharing with your community, you are all getting to know each other better and everyone wins.

have fun encourage sharingEncourage sharing to have fun and get to know each other.

Always be thinking about how you can be a good resource for your communityand create a great experience for your fans. Your Facebook Page will grow and so will your business.

How to Improve Your Social Media “Calls to Action”

Source: socialmediaexaminer.com

How to Improve Your Social Media Calls to Action

Is your audience responding to your social activities?

Have you integrated the right calls to action into your social media strategy?

A call to action is a way for you to entice your social media audience to focus their attention on the next action you want them to take.

Here are seven steps for crafting calls to action to get your social community to do what you’d like them to and transform your social media marketing to get the results you want.

#1: Determine What You Want Prospects to Do

Your call to action should encourage readers to engage with you further.

You’ll want to break the activity into smaller steps that make sense to your audience. You can lose prospects at each step of the process, so you want to make it very easy for them.

Make readers an offer they want. What will get prospects to commit now? Your offer will vary based on your business and where the prospect is in the sales process. You can consider offering white paper downloads, ebooks, ongoing emails, discount coupons and/or free consultations.

#2: Create a Great Hook

You’ll need to answer the question, “What’s in it for me?” This is what your prospects want to know.

And your request must make sense to them. This means not asking prospects to purchase if they’re still in an information-gathering mode.

So you’ll want to assess the tradeoff prospects are willing to make. From a participants’ perspective, going to the next step means they have to consider if it’s worth their effort and social capital. Consider the 90%/9%/1% ratio of social media engagement.

social media participation ratesOn social media platforms, participants tend to follow a 90% view, 9% share and 1% create.

Skip the promotion. People active on most social media platforms are focused on socializing and aren’t prepared to buy.

Among the exceptions are blogs, Tumblr and Pinterest. These social media venues encourage sales by providing valuable content that persuades, not merely promotes.

For example, below are three sample implied calls to action. King Arthur’s Flour offers recipes with enticing photos and explanations of baked goods with links to their product.

king arthur flour muffinKing Arthur’s Flour blog has several calls to action above the fold.

By contrast, Target uses Tumblr to show customers the fashion backstory and how to style their clothes. There’s no “Buy, Buy, Buy” in their content. They use social media sharing and notes to build customer excitement and engagement pre-purchase.

prabal gurung targetTarget Style’s Tumblr for their Spring 2013 Collection featuring Prabal Gurung.

#3: Motivate Prospects to Act

Remember, you want to give your readers a reason to act.

Provide sense of urgency. Remember you’re not just competing against other retailers for the same item or other tradeoffs; your bigger opposition is customer inaction. It’s much easier for prospects to click to the next shiny item. Tests byMarketing Experiments proved that increasing the urgency of the call to action improved response.

Make people an offer they can’t refuseGive them a one-time offer to encourage a response. Realize, however, they may only buy when you provide coupons going forward.

#4: Optimize Your Call to Action

Like other aspects of your content, formatting matters! Here are some points to consider.

  • Use a contextually relevant presentation. Your offer should make sense based on the social media platform where it appears. Use a consistent voice and language to represent your 360° brand.
  • Make your call to action stand out visually. Use color, typography and wording to enhance presentation of your call to action.
  • Qualify your offer. Make readers feel that opportunities are limited or time-sensitive. For example, “There are only 100 tickets left”.
  • Limit selection choices. Don’t give prospects too many options or you’ll suppress response because readers will put off acting because they need time to consider your offer.
  • Place calls to action in multiple locations on your pages. Take the “Don’t make me think” approach. Don’t assume using only one call to action will yield optimal results. For example, put social sharing buttons at the top and bottom of articles.
  • Keep calls to action above the fold. Make your call to action visible so your offer isn’t dependent on participants scrolling down. Similarly, have a persistent banner or other calls to action below the fold.
  • Put call-to-action options in order of importance. While you can present more than one call to action, make the hierarchy of importance clear to participants. The more important option should be bigger, shown first or be given more prominent positioning.
  • Include social sharing. Ask participants to share your offer with their social network by using social sharing buttons. 
    ll bean million moment campaignL.L.Bean Million Moment Campaign uses social media calls to action on Twitter, YouTube, Google+ and Foursquare, as well as at live events and on their blog.

#5: Maintain a Consistent Presentation on Landing Pages

This is one of the biggest reasons calls to action don’t work. Send prospects to the appropriate step in the purchase process.

Make sure you use the same wording and graphics. The goal is to show continuity. Don’t let the reader think that you’ve sent them to the wrong place or they’ll leave.

king arthur call to actionUse of implied call-to-action on King Arthur Flour recipe for Morning Glory Muffins.

king arthur linksKing Arthur’s Flour links to Morning Glory Recipe have a consistent look and feel.

Tailor landing pages to increase resultsHubSpot research found that using more landing pages yielded better results. This makes sense because it translates to more targeted offers.

hubspot researchHubSpot chart showing the increase in the number of landing pages results in increased leads.

#6: Test to Maximize Results

Every element of your call to action can be tested. When testing, only modify one factor at a time or you won’t know what caused the change. Among the attributes to test are:

  • Text. Check the text on buttons as well as information surrounding the call to action.
  • Color. Take a holistic view of color. Consider the text and button colors, the background and the use of white space around the call to action.
  • Graphics. Test the use of photographs and other images.
  • Size. Assess the size of the call to action relative to the rest of the content.
  • Placement. Consider where on the page the call to action appears.

#7: Measure Results

How can you measure your results? You want to track the impact of your social media calls to action back to your original objectives. Here are some metrics to track:

  • Impressions are the number of people exposed to the call to action.
  • Click-throughs are the number of people who take action.
  • Click-through rate is the percentage of people who checked out your offer out of the number of people who saw it.
  • Completions are the number of people who filled out your form and submitted it.
  • Completion rate is the percentage of people who complete your form out of the number of people who clicked through.

6 Facebook Metrics Marketers Should Be Measuring

6 Facebook Metrics Marketers Should Be Measuring

By 
Published March 18, 2013

Source: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com

Do you track your Facebook marketing?

Do you feel lost when you’re looking at your Facebook Page statistics?

Well, you’re not alone. Facebook metrics can be overwhelming and most Facebook Insights terminology is still hazy for many of us.

As a marketer, you know that what can be measured can be managed (and improved). So even if it seems complex, you need to measure your Facebook Page’s performance.

What statistics should you measure on your Facebook Page?

First you’ll want to focus on your Facebook post metrics. These are the only relevant indicators of the performance of your content. The other Facebook data can be misleading or gamed. But it’s very hard to trick individual post metrics.

Here are the six key metrics you need to track to understand your Facebook Page performance, why you need them and where to find them.

#1: Fan Reach

Fan reach simply corresponds to the number of fans of your Page who have seen any given post. This is “organic” reach, which means that it only records the views that occurred directly, and not through an action of a friend of a fan (such as a like, share or comment). The views that result from a friend’s actions are recorded in “viral” views.

Where to find your fan reach metrics

The fan reach metric is not available in the Facebook statistics interface; it’s only available in an Excel file available for download.

fan reach dataTo access fan reach data, you first need to export the data to Excel.

export insights dataChoose the format, the date range and select “post level data.”

You’ll find it under the label “Lifetime Post reach by people who like your Page.” This is not as user-friendly as the web interface, I know, but it is important enough to spend the time retrieving this information.

lifetime post reachWithin the Key Metrics tab, look for the column labeled “Lifetime Post reach by people who like your Page.”

Why your fan reach metrics are important to know

The per-post fan reach is probably the most important metric. It’s a key indicator. It helps you measure the appeal of your content to your audience and appreciate the quality of your audience.

An audience recruited from an eye-catching contest (or worse, bought through the thousands of questionable sites that sell “fans”) will quickly hide your posts from their newsfeed. If they don’t actively unsubscribe, their lack of interest (and therefore disengagement) will cause them to be effectively unsubscribed from your posts due to Facebook’s EdgeRank feature working behind the scenes.

Fan reach is a key indicator of the health of your Facebook Page. The higher the quality of your audience and the more interesting your content, the more fans (and potential fans) you will reach.

#2: Organic Reach

Organic reach corresponds with the number of people, fans and non-fans, who have seen a given post. As with fan reach, organic reach only records views that are not the result of a friend of a fan’s action (which is counted in the viral reach).

The real difference between the fan reach (above) and this metric is that the organic reach includes views of people that are not fans of the Page but have directly accessed your Page or seen its content in a widget (for example, a “like box” on your site or blog).

Where to find your organic reach metrics

The organic reach is easier to find, as it is located within the Insight interface of your Page.

Just go to your Insights, scroll down to your list of posts, click on the Reach number for each post and hover your mouse on the bar chart for “Organic”and you’ll see the number.

You can also see this stat under each post if you’re logged into your Page.

organic reachOnce on the Insights interface, click on the number of people reached for the post in question and hover your mouse over the “Organic” bar chart, you’ll see the organic reach number for that post.

So, if you have not downloaded the Excel file to get your fan reach as outlined above, you can check your organic reach metrics instead. But remember that your organic reach metrics can be quite different from your fan reach metrics.

The example below shows the differences we found between two Pages when comparing results of these two metrics.

fan reach organic reachThe difference between fan reach and organic reach can vary significantly from one Page to another.

As you can see, your organic reach may not be an accurate reflection of your fan reach. So before relying on organic reach instead of fan reach, check if your Page has a big difference between the two.

Why your organic reach metrics are important to know

Organic reach can replace fan reach in the metrics you want to follow, but only if the average difference between organic and fan reach is not too high with your audience.

Your organic reach metrics can help you identify ways to improve your content’s organic visibility. For example, when organic reach is very close to fan reach, it usually means that people cannot be exposed to your content if they are not already fans.

This could be the consequence of a lack of proper communication about your Fan Page on your other marketing channels. If you have a website, a blog and a newsletter and there is very little difference between your organic and fan reach results, it probably means that you are not attracting a new non-fan audience to your content.

If this is your case, try to better promote your Page on other channels and you should see your organic reach going up.

#3: Engagement

According to Facebook, with regards to post level metrics, engagement is “the number of people who clicked anywhere in your post.

This includes liking, commenting and sharing and people who’ve viewed your video or clicked on your links and photos. And it also includes people who’ve clicked on a commenter’s name, liked a comment, clicked on your Page name and even gave negative feedback by reporting your post.

Engaged users are people who have clicked on this content from anywhere.

It’s the most important metric to know after your reach metric. Reach tells you how many people have potentially seen your content; engagement is the number of people who have interacted with your content.

Where to find your engagement metrics

To see the engagement metric for each post, go to your Insights at the same place where you looked at your organic reach. The number of people who engaged with your content is right there in the “Engaged Users” column.

engaged usersThe Engaged Users metric is easy to see on your Facebook Insights page.

Why your engagement metrics are important to know

Engagement—whether the type that implies “acting” on your post by commenting, liking or sharing it, or the type that is more “passive,” such as watching the video, zooming on a photo or clicking on a link—is probably the second most important metric to focus on if you are serious about measuring your Page’s performance.

It’s not enough for your updates to be viewed by a lot of people. You need to make sure that the content you offer your audience triggers some kind of interest. And engagement is the only measurable sign of interest.

When measuring engagement, do not focus on the raw number you see in your Insights. The only way to really understand that metric and compare posts is to look at the number of engaged people and the number of people reached for the post in question.

The only way to compare a post engagement metric with your other posts is to create a percentage. This gives you a number that you can use to benchmark the performance of each of your posts.

formulaUse this formula for each post to compare the performance of one post against another.

This formula helps you understand your results. If you rely solely on the number of engaged users, you’ll never know if good engagement on a specific post is due to the quality of your content, or if it was simply shown to more people.

This gives you a percentage that takes the exposure of the post into account and allows the comparison between posts.

benchmark postsCreating these percentages helps benchmark posts against one another.

#4: People Talking About This (or Storytellers)

The “People Talking About This” data in Facebook Insights is sometimes referred to as “Storytellers.” This is one of Facebook’s metrics that few people understand.

Here’s what you need to know. This metric is part of the engagement metric. So the number of “people talking about” a post is included in the number of people who “engaged” with that post.

The “people talking about this” metric only measures three types of actions: likes, comments or shares.

What makes “people talking about this” different from the engagement metric above is that it highlights the number of your fans who did something to show engagement to their friends.

Where to find your “people talking about this” metrics

Again, go to your Insights interface where you found your organic reach and engagement stats, and look at the “Talking About This” column. Easy.

people talking about thisWhen you click on the “People Talking About This” number for each post, you see a breakdown of the type of action made on each post.

Why your “people talking about this” metric is important to know

This is the “viral” metric. One of your motivations for creating a Facebook Page was probably to connect with the friends of your existing fans for free! The “people talking about this” metric is the best for measuring how many people are willing to spread the word about you to their friends.

Remember, when a user likes, comments on or shares a post on your Page, Facebook may decide to publish this to this user’s friends to show that this user liked, commented on or shared a piece of content from your Page. I emphasize the “may” because Facebook is limiting the reach of these stories.

So, don’t expect too much from this metric. Although Facebook is still the best place to leverage viral stories like these, it’s not what it used to be. You used to frequently see in your newsfeed that a friend had liked, commented on or shared a piece of content from a Page. Chances are that you see less of this today.

#5: Click-Through Rate

Here comes a metric that you are sure to be familiar with! The CTR, or click-through rate, has been around for years on the web. It’s used to measure the effectiveness of email marketing, banner advertising, search engine ads such as Adwords campaigns or landing page quality.

The good news is that it means the same thing within Facebook. Click-through rates tell you the number of people who have clicked on a link in your content, watched your video or viewed a larger version of your photo.

Where to find your click-through metrics

Go to your Page Insights interface, click on the Engaged Users number and you’ll find the number of users who have clicked on your content.

If the content is a link, it will be named “Link Clicks;” if it is a video, it will be labeled “Video Plays;” if it is a photo, it’ll read “Photo Views.” Pretty straightforward.

click through ratesDepending on the type of content you are looking at, you’ll find click-through rates shown as “Photos Views,” “Video Plays” and “Link Clicks.”

Why your click-through metrics are important to know

It is nice to know how many people have potentially seen your content (the reach metric), and even nicer to know how many of them were interested enough to act on it (engaged users), as outlined above.

But the bottom line is to know how many people were interested enough to pay attention to your content. And this means watching your video, looking at your photo or checking out your link.

The click-through metric is the bottom of your content quality funnel. Keep an eye on it.

#6: Negative Feedback

Negative feedback is a “negative” action taken by a fan on your piece of content. It can be hiding a specific post, hiding all future posts from your Page, unliking your Page or even worse, reporting it as spam.

Simply put, the negative feedback metric counts the number of users who really did not like your content or the fact that it appeared in their newsfeed.

Where to find your negative feedback metrics

Go to your Page Insights interface, click on the Engaged Users number and you’ll find the number of users who gave negative feedback at the bottom of that window.

negative feedbackClick on the Engaged Users number for each post and you’ll see the “negative feedback” number in small print.

You cannot see the breakdown for the negative feedback number here in the Insights. If you want to know what negative actions were actually taken, you will have todownload the Excel export as mentioned in the fan reach section above.

Why your negative feedback metrics are important to know

Since September 2012, Facebook has given more weight to the negative feedback metric. Posts with a high negative feedback number will have much less exposure through EdgeRank and Pages with an average negative feedback that remains high will have less and less reach over time.

Needless to say, if you want to benefit from your Facebook marketing, you need to keep your negative feedback numbers as low as possible.

As with all other engagement metrics (engaged users, people talking about your Page, clicks, etc.), when measuring negative feedback, do not focus on the number you see on your Insights dashboard.

The only way to really understand your negative feedback metric and compare the data you have for your different posts is to create a percentage score with the number of people who gave negative feedback and the number reached for that particular post.

You’ll end up with a percentage that makes sense because it takes the exposure of the post into account and allows you to compare results from different posts.

When looking at negative feedback in percentages, I’ve found the average negative feedback is 0.1%, but some Pages go as high as 0.7%!

post insightsLook at both your negative feedback and engagement scores in percentages.

Use These Six Metrics to Improve Your Facebook Marketing

Measuring your Facebook Page performance may seem like a daunting task if you have to do it manually from the Facebook Insights interface or the Excel download. And you may find it useful to start doing it that way to understand where the data comes from and what it means.

But once you’re familiar with the metrics, you can use third-party tools to save time. Although there are others, these free tools are a great place to start: Page Analyzer and Simply Measured (free version).

You can also decide to invest in paid tools such as QuintlyPageleverPostAcumenand Wisemetrics.

Facebook Posting Insight

Facebook Posting Techniques that Really Work

There’s a fine line between a scientific approach to marketing on Facebook and a haphazard shotgun approach. For those of you who prefer not to “point and shoot,” a new study from a San Francisco-based social media strategy firm offers an in-depth analysis of the top 20,000 Facebook Pages and up to a quarter million posts in an effort to determine the most useful posting techniques.

In the just-released report called Engagement and Interaction: A Scientific Approach to Facebook Marketing (link opens a PDF file), Momentus Media. provides answers to the seven most frequently asked questions by Facebook page administrators:

  1. When’s the best time to post? While weekends and off-peak hours from 2pm to 5am are the times when page admins are least likely to add a new post, those are the posts that receive the highest interaction rates. Thursdays, on the other hand, shoulder the highest number of postings during the week and the lowest interaction rate. And since a high level of postings results in a lower interaction rate from users, it only stands to reason that posting in off-peak hours means you’ll gain more interaction from fans.
  2. How many times should I post per day? You’d think too many posts would offend your followers but the report suggests frequent posting increases interaction. As you might suspect, fewer posts reduce the chances users will see them. And while unsubscribe rates go up after three posts per day, they level off at higher frequencies. The secret is to find that balance between optimizing interaction and managing unsubscribes, which is going to be different for every business.
  3. What type of content elicits the most interaction? By far, photos generate the highest interaction rate for the six varieties of content, with status updates ranking No. 2. Others — in descending order — include video, music and links. The fact that links are at the bottom is interesting, considering they are posted the most often. Photos rank at the top because they’re visual, easy to digest and they elicit emotion.
  4. Should I ask fans to Like or Comment on my posts? Absolutely. Just by taking advantage of a “Like” call to action boosts your interaction rate by 216 percent. Momentus Media analyzed 49,266 Page posts, comparing interaction rates for posts with “Like” and “Comment” calls to action and those without. And while only 1.3 percent of status messages had a call to action attached, those who used “Like” or “Comment” showed a huge boost in interaction rates.
  5. Should I ask my fans questions? You’d think that by asking questions you’d get a better interaction rate, but such is not the case. However, Facebook page admins looking to achieve the highest comment rate should pose questions and then directly ask for fans to reply with comments.
  6. How long should my status messages be? According to this study, size does matter. While there’s a higher posting rate for shorter posts (especially those that stay within the 140-character limit for cross-posting purposes on both Twitter and Facebook), interaction increases as the length of the status message increases.
  7. How long do my messages remain in the Newsfeed? In the first hour of a Facebook status update, half of the users who will click on the post will have done so, with 90 percent of the clicks occurring within nine hours of the post going live.

Souce: Entrepreneur website

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When Are Facebook Users Most Active?

We know that users are spending increasing amounts of time online on social networks likeFacebook, but when exactly are users the most active? Social media management companyVitrue just released a study that identifies the days and hours users are most active on the Facebook channels maintained by companies and brands.

For the study, Vitrue analyzed Facebook post data from August 10, 2007 to October 10, 2010 from more than 1,500 brand streams — more than 1.64 million posts and 7.56 million comments in all. Shares and “likes” were not included in the study.

Here are some of the big takeaways:

  • The three biggest usage spikes tend to occur on weekdays at 11:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. ET.
  • The biggest spike occurs at 3:00 p.m. ET on weekdays.
  • Weekday usage is pretty steady, however Wednesday at 3:00 pm ET is consistently the busiest period.
  • Fans are less active on Sunday compared to all other days of the week.

 

Morning Posts Are More Effective

Although most posts and comments appear around 3:00 p.m. ET, posts published in the morning tend to perform better than those published in the afternoon.

 

Vitrue’s data indicates that morning brand posts are 39.7% more effective in terms of user engagement than those published in the afternoon.

Additionally, the top of the hour (:0 to :15 minutes) tend to see more interaction than other parts of the hour. The second half of the hour (:30 to :45 minutes) is the second most popular time for interaction.

 

This makes sense if you think about how meetings and breaks are scheduled. A quick check on Facebook before heading into another meeting or task might be more likely to happen at the top of an hour than in the middle or toward the end.

Why This Matters

Ultimately, the goal for brands on Facebook is to be able to engage with their customers or potential customers and to promote a message. Last month, we looked at a study that broke down how users interact with brands on Facebook.

 

In that post, Mashable‘s Adam Ostrow noted, “… 65% of Facebook users only access the site when they’re not at work or school — typically early morning or evening. That means that if you’re making social media only a part of a 9 to 5 work day, you might be missing out on connecting with consumers during the times they’re likely to be online.”

Vitrue’s findings match that sentiment. Knowing when users are engaging and interacting with your page can be crucial to getting the most effective message across.

To be clear, this data is going to continue to shift as usage patterns shift. There is more to knowing when users are active to designating a publishing schedule. After all, if all publishers pushed out content at the same time, users would be overwhelmed and the net gain might disappear.

Still, following these type of usage patterns is an important part of maximizing the way brands and users can communicate.

Source: Mashable website